Interview with Vibrant Demi Hungerford!

I am thrilled and proud to introduce you to Demi Hungerford!

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Born and raised in Southern California, DL Hungerford began writing right about the time you would expect. She has worked as a child care provider, a cook, a caterer, a clerk, customer service operator, blackjack dealer, house cleaner, bird breeder, a case worker for local government, and a supervisor of case workers. She honed her writing skills through fanzines, epic letters, and minutes for various clubs. She also wrote newsletter submissions for clubs, as well as movie and book reviews.

DL loves the world of fiction, especially Regency England, but hopes to explore other horizons as time permits. She still lives in Southern California with her husband, a spoiled cat, a spoiled dog, and a flock of parrots and other birds.

She also writes under the pen name of Roxanna Haley. You can contact her through any of the various links below:

http://windr0se.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/HungerfordsHistoricals/

https://www.facebook.com/RoxannaHaleyAuthor/?fref=ts

http://www.amazon.com/Roxanna-Haley/e/B00XZC10BS/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

So, to kick things off, I’m going to ask a blatantly selfish question and pick your brain. I’m entering into the trials of marketing myself right now. Did you make any marketing mistakes or is there anything you would avoid in future?

I made a lot of marketing mistakes. I didn’t understand the importance of getting reviews. I didn’t put money into publicity. I didn’t even pay $5 for a Facebook ad. I put too much money into Facebook release day parties which attracted people who wanted to win prizes but not buy books. In the future, I will not do the parties, I will do ads, and I will beg for reviews.

Ha! Okay. Taking note. Takes money to make money. How do you publish your books and why? Traditional versus indie?

I’m always open to traditional publishing, but honestly indie is better for the audience and the authors. Removing the limits of what the Big Books people think will sell opens up so many horizons for story genres and finds the audiences that are out there feeling neglected. Of course, I am publishing indie right now because it’s what is available to me. I have a NaNoWriMo project that I am going to pitch because I think it’s a great story. So being a hybrid author, appeals to me.

Me too! What marketing strategies do you find most helpful? Any resources you would recommend to other authors or aspiring authors?

The strategy of getting a street team and having them help spread the word about the books is a great one, but I haven’t gotten there yet. I love ChoosyBookworm.com which gets readers to read and review. https://choosybookworm.com/book-reviews/

Jot. Jot. Jot. Blatant note-taking. Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors.

I read constantly. When I am driving, I listen to audio books. I have a reader on my cell phone so that I am never without a book. I love Jane Austen, of course, and Mary Balogh. Charles Stross, Ben Aaronovich, John Scalzi, Joanna Bourne, David Brin, Lois McMaster Bujold, Ernest Cline, Stephen R. Donaldson, Jerry Dubs, Tameri Etherton, Lisa Kessler, Diana Gabaldon, Neil Gaiman, Molly Harper, Mika Jolie, Debbie Johnson, Elle Kennedy, Christopher Moore, Anne Rice, Sir Terry Pratchett, Susan Squires, Neal Stephenson, Lolly Winston, Beverly Jenkins, are we out of room yet? 8)

Has this influenced how your writing process works? Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?

The answer is yes. I do a chapter by chapter plot point list. But usually by the fourth chapter I have gone way off that chart and it’s time to revise the points. No book works for me in writing if I have to stick too closely to an outline.

I cannot thank you enough for your time, Demi! So much fun chatting with you!